MISSION: PILIPINAS

State subsidized health care is scare in developing countries.

In the Philippines, less than 3% of the nation's GDP is spent on its citizens,

while 60% of its hospitals are privately run.

Coupled with the rapid growth of population,

the government's inability to provide medical care to the public

is felt most among the poor communities living in remote places,

where access and affordability is a hindrance to their wellbeing.

In February 2014,

HOPE FOUND returned to the Philippines

with 25 volunteers from California

for the mission's annual outreach.

BARANGAY TAGANITO

In Surigao del Norte, our group ran two missions simultaneously.  One team served families from surrounding communities in the mining town of Barangay Taganito.

BATARAZA, PALAWAN

Our last stop was on the western side of the Philippines, on the southern point of Palawan.  In Rio Tuba, another mining community, our surgical teams saw a particularly high number of children needing cleft palate surgery.

TAGUIG-PATEROS

HOPE Foundation begins minor and major surgeries in the operation room of Taguig-Pateros District Hospital in Metro Manila.

CARAGA REGIONAL

Up the coast, a second group ran its missions in the operating rooms of Caraga Regional Hospital, where major surgeries were performed on major patients.

We've sent a team of volunteers to the Philippines

on a humanitarian medical + surgical mission

every year since 1987.

PAG-ASA SA ATING PILIPINAS

VOLUNTEER FEBRUARY '15

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IN THE PHILIPPINES

HOPE FOUND IN THE PHILIPPINES

After nearly three decades in operation, the medical mission has challenged itself to expand its services to cover more areas across the islands of the Philippines.

Presently, at least three and at times as many as five stops are scheduled on the agenda in the two weeks spent traveling between the vastly dense metropolitan city slums and the most remote areas of the country each February, strategically targeting specific regions inhabited by the poorest populations.

 

Though distinctly different from the other, the diverse localities commonly share the same problem that trouble their communities: the lack of access to health care. Whether gradually pushed away to city limits by urban development or naturally secluded in the backwoods and boondocks that surround them, these neglected pockets of the Philippines have similarly been left to swell and surge to a high concentration of indigents suffering in need and in lack of the most basic care.

 

This has allowed the mission and its volunteers to offer the coveted, no-cost medical services to a wider range of the country's massive population separated—and often left isolated—by its 7,000 islands.

Many of the slum villages' squatters

have finally been able to visit a hospital

and receive quality medical treatment.

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HOPE FOUND

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